Category Archives: politics

Australia’s Gun Control Laws Probably Worked

There’s an odd article in the Washington Post by Leah Libresco, formerly of 538, that says: I researched the strictly tightened gun laws in Britain and Australia and concluded that they didn’t prove much about what America’s policy should be. … Continue reading

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What To Do In the Event of an Atmosphere Nuclear Test by North Korea

Don’t panic. The current range of North Korean missiles sufficient to reach North America, and given the rate of progress they will likely be able to hit almost anywhere in the world by the end of the year. But the … Continue reading

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How Gay Marriage Affected Me

Apparently Australia is having a “postal survey” on gay marriage, and I thought it might be interesting to give Australians a view of the subject from a Canadian perspective, because it has had a huge effect on my life here … Continue reading

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An Individualist Humanist in a Tribal World

Stand on a beach some time, somewhere well up on dry land. Above the high water mark. Notice you don’t drown. Then walk down toward the water. If the wind is blowing and the water is rough, there will be … Continue reading

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Billions in Weirdness

A friend​ asked me about the science behind this project backed by Indian American billionaire Manoj Bhargava and I thought it worth a little more public response. There are four technologies discussed on this site: stationary bike for energy generation … Continue reading

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Global Warming: so-so science, horrible politics

Rupert Darwall’s The Age of Global Warming is an interesting and important book for people who want to understand the political and diplomatic history of climate change. Environmentalism comes in two kinds: pragmatists who want to formulate policy based on … Continue reading

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Statistical Effect of Block Voting

Will block voting result in poor election predictions? The left-wing political organization LeadNow is running what appears to be a pretty effective campaign to organize voter blocks in swing ridings, where Stephen Harper’s Conservatives are at risk of winning due … Continue reading

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My Canada Includes Stephen Harper

My Canada includes Stephen Harper. Unlike many of my progressive friends, I have an inclusive view of Canada. It’s a big country. It includes everyone. Even Stephen. It includes a history where “None is too many!” was a popular slogan, … Continue reading

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There was only one catch…

The civil service is the permanent government of Canada. This is why senior civil service positions have titles like “Permanent Undersecretary for Whatever”. The purpose of Parliament is to exercise political control over the civil service. This is the foundation … Continue reading

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Opinions, Judgements and the Bayesian Revolution

This article on what it means to “have an opinion” is not bad, but it muddles two fundamentally different types of “opinion” and as such fails to get at the root of the problem, and misses important ideas about diversity … Continue reading

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